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  • 688349_lead

    Delaware Történeti Múzeum kiállításvezető

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    Program booklet of the exhibition "Innovative Traditions", exhibition brochure. Donated by Ms. Linda Norris.

  • 686169_lead

    Serényi Miklós adománya. 1994

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    Donation of Mr. Miklós Serényi, 1994. Envelope in which Mr. Miklós Serényi sent documents to the Gömör Museum of Putnok.

  • 693771_lead

    Friedl Sárika

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    The photo on which Ms.Sárika Friedl can be seen, too.

  • Hudson Photographic Industries Viewer Products Inc. Model 115 filmvetítő

    Hudson Photographic Industries Viewer Products Inc. Model 115 filmvetítő

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    Low performance projector produced in Irvington-on-Hudson, New York, USA in the 1970s. The manually driven plastic device is suitable for projecting 8 mm films, operates with 2 pcs. of AA batteries.

  • Argus Cordless Electromatic 692 automata dianéző

    Argus Cordless Electromatic 692 automata dianéző

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    Slide-viewer made in the United States of America in the 1970s. The device is suitable for viewing framed slide pictures, automatically changes them at 5 second intervals and magnifies them on its screen 3 times. It works with 2 pcs. of D batteries.

  • 387035_lead

    Sawyers- és GAF View-Master nézőkék

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    Inventor William B. Gruber introduced his 3D stereoscope at the New York World's Fair in 1939. The early reels were made out of 16 mm Kodachrome films, which can be rolled with a simple button, located on the side of the viewer. During World War II it was used for military education. It became popular when the production of reels for children about tales and comics started (other themes also remained in production). Between 1939 and 1966, View-Master slide viewers were made by the American Sawyer's Company, after 1966 by GAF (General Aniline & Film) Corporation.

  • Bell & Howell TQ III Specialist vetítő

    Bell & Howell TQ III Specialist vetítő

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    TQ III Specialist projector made by Bell & Howell company in Wheeling, Illinois, USA in the 1970s. The big-size device can project 16 mm films, its objective can be used for CinemaScope films as well, and it has a built-in amplifier.

  • Kodak Cavalcade 500 Projector diavetítő

    Kodak Cavalcade 500 Projector diavetítő

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    Cavalcade 500 Projector produced by Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, New York, the United States of America from 1958. The device was designed for professional use: remote controlled, automatic, has 2,5/127 mm objective, worked with 105-125 V, 500-600 W bulb. It could show framed leica slide pictures.

  • Sawyer's G Model View-Master nézőke

    Sawyers Model G View-Master nézőke

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    Sawyer's Model G View-Master stereoscope was made in Oregon, the USA in the 1960s. It was the most successful type in the West. Stereoscopic reels can be seen with it.

  • Dukane 500 28A vetítőgép

    Dukane 500 28A vetítőgép

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    Projector was made in St. Charles, Illinois, USA in the 1960s. It can show 35 mm silent films and slide films. It has separated switches for the fan and the bulb, allowing it to cool down.

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